Is premium sherpa warmer than fleece?

Is premium sherpa warmer than fleece? - Dakini
Umair Nazaqat
Umair Nazaqat

Finding clothing suitable for outdoor enthusiasts is crucial to their comfort and performance, particularly as temperatures decrease. When temperatures dip, two popular fabric choices emerge - fleece and sherpa are popular alternatives that provide warmth when temperatures drop - yet which of these cosy materials reign supreme? Is premium sherpa warmer than fleece? Let's delve into them so we can make an informed decision together.

Fleece Is a Dependable Classic

Fleece is a trusted classic fabric known for its softness, breathability, and insulation properties. Available in multiple thicknesses to meet different weather conditions. Here's an overview of its key attributes.

  • Warmth: Fleece provides excellent insulation, trapping air between its fibres to provide warmth without adding weight. However, its warmth-to-weight ratio varies depending on which fleece type is purchased.
  • Breathability: Fleece also wicks away moisture vapour effectively so as not to leave you sweating while engaging in active pursuits or leaving you clammy during activities.
  • Weight and Packability: Fleece garments tend to be lightweight and packable, making them great for layering up. 
  • Drying Time: As fleece dries relatively rapidly after sweaty activities or unexpected rainfall events.

Dakini offers an assortment of premium fleece products, like the Women's Dakini Stretch Fleece 1.4 Zip Pullover made of high-grade material to offer maximum warmth without compromising breathability. This pullover's zipper allows easy wearability without restricting airflow for optimal warmth without any compromise on breathability.

Sherpa: the Champion of Coziness 

In contrast with fleece, Sherpa fabric boasts a thicker and more luxurious texture with a deep pile that offers increased warmth and comfort. Here's an overview of its properties:

  • Warmth: Sherpa provides exceptional warmth due to its dense pile that traps air for insulation in very cold weather conditions, making it the ideal material. 
  • Breathability: Although sherpa may feel comfortable when exercising strenuously, its breathability might leave you sweatier during strenuous activities than other materials like fleece would allow.
  • Weight and Packability: Sherpa tends to be heavier and bulkier than fleece, making it less packable for travel purposes. Sherpa tends to be durable with regular wear-and-tear usage.
  • Drying Time: Due to its deep pile it may snag or mat over time and requires longer drying times than its thinner counterpart, whilst fleece takes less drying time due to thickness issues. 

Comparing Sherpa to Fleece

Your ideal fabric choice depends entirely upon your unique requirements and intended use. 

Feature

Fleece

Sherpa

Warmth

Good

Excellent

Breathability

High

Lower

Weight

Lightweight

Heavy & Bulky

Packability

Packs down easily

Less packable

Durability

Durable

Can snag & mat

Drying Time

Dries relatively fast

Takes longer to dry

Ideal for

Moderate warmth & activities

Maximum warmth & cold weather

Finding the Perfect Balance at Dakini

At Dakini, we understand the significance of finding gear tailored specifically to your adventures. That's why our selection of premium fleece and sherpa options is here: whether it be an airy fleece pullover for hiking through rugged terrain or a luxurious sherpa jacket for cool evening walks - Dakini has just the perfect balance of warmth, comfort, and performance to suit every outdoor escapade! 

Check out our collection today and find your next outdoor journey equipment solution here!

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